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Roasted Prime Rib with Horseradish Sauce

Nothing gets your guests’ attention at the table, or your attention in the kitchen, like spending nearly a hundred dollars on a piece of meat, but a prime rib doesn’t have to be intimidating. Instead, impress yourself in your own kitchen by cooking it the way the pros do: with a two-step heating process and a few more dollars invested in an accurate meat thermometer.

Serving: Serves 8 - 10

Ingredients

one 3- or 4-bone standing prime rib roast, about 7 pounds
lots sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup sour cream
1/2 cup prepared horseradish
2 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh chives

Instructions

Place a roasting pan in the lower third of the oven and preheat it to 450°F (230°C).

Thoroughly dry the meat by patting it with paper towels. This will help it brown quickly by getting rid of any surface moisture. Rub the surface of the meat with lots of coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.
To sear the top surface, place the roast—rib side up—in a roasting pan and roast for 30 minutes. Flip the roast over and turn the oven down to 300°F (150°C). Continue roasting until an instant-read thermometer placed in the thickest part of the meat reads 135°F to 140°F (57°C to 60°C), about 3 hours in total. This will give you a perfect medium-rare to medium roast. For medium, wait until the thermometer reads 150°F (65°C), about 30 minutes more.
Remove the roast from the oven and rest it in a warm place loosely covered with several layers of foil for 15 to 20 minutes. Its stressed-out fibres will relax and re-absorb the juices that concentrate under great pressure in the centre of the meat during roasting. The internal temperature will slowly rise another 5°F to 10°F (20°C to 23°C) or so. This is known as carryover cooking and is factored into the doneness judgment above.

Meanwhile, whisk together the sour cream, horseradish and chives. Once the meat has rested, slice away and serve with the horseradish sauce.


Ask your butcher for a roast from the “small” end of the larger full prime rib; the end nearest the loin is prized for its full shape and tender flavour. Be sure to specify that the “chine” bone be removed; it’s part of the backbone and will give you trouble slicing the meat. If the roast is “tied,” it will roast more evenly, but it’s not absolutely critical.

Roasting large cuts of meat requires a balance of cooking methods. A high-heat roast will yield the beautiful crisp outside that makes prime rib so tasty. But, by the time the inside cooks through, the high heat will lead to a burnt exterior. The high heat also stresses the meat, shrinking it and squeezing out the vital moisture. A low-heat roast, while slower to cook, will result in much less shrinkage and a more even doneness. Unfortunately, slow heat won’t brown the outside as nicely as high, fast heat. The solution? A combination.

Comments

  1. Ajwain said: On May 15, 2013

    Thanks for finally talking about >Chef Michael Smith | recipe | Roasted Prime Rib
    with Horseradish Sauce <Liked it!

  2. michelle said: On Jan 16, 2013

    Chef Michael

    I am having a 3 lb Prime Rib roast for dinner, do you have any suggestions on the type of vegetables that will enhance the meal more. I would like to do some kind of potatoe too.

    Thank you for your input, you have a lot of great ideas.

    I love to cook for my man and I would like to learn as much as possible.

    Sincerely,

    Michelle Coleman

  3. Glenn said: On Sep 26, 2012

    I have to ask…I love your recipes and recently subscribed to the Food network JUST because you are on it…but…I have never been able to make a “Good” Prime Rib Roast..your recipes says rub with LOTS of sea salt, I have been told NO SALT as it pulls the juices from the meat and makes it dry…am I missing something?

    • Dave said: On Sep 26, 2012

      It’s okay – salt away. It seasons the outside of the roast and helps to create the sort of amazing crust that you really really want on a prime rib. It will not adversely affect the mass of beef and pull the juices out of it. Perhaps if you left it on there for a few days in preparation for a long sea journey, but it won’t have any negative impact for the duration of roasting the prime rib.
      Enjoy this recipe, it’s a keeper!

    • STEVE said: On Mar 24, 2013

      THE SALT DOES DRAW MOISTURE OUT BUT IT IS RE-ABSORBED DURING THE RESTING PROCESS….I REMEMBER AROUND 10 YEARS AGO MOST CHEFS SAYING THAT SALTING ANY KIND OF MEAT IS A NO-NO FOR THE REASON YOU STATED….BUT COOKING , MUCH LIKE LOTS OF THINGS CHANGE WITH THE TIMES THE MORE WE KNOW ABOUT IT

  4. click said: On May 27, 2012

    I adore that site layout . How do you make it? Its so good!

  5. Laurie said: On Dec 28, 2011

    So does the recipe call for a 3-4 lb roast, or a 7lb roast?

    • Clarissa said: On Feb 5, 2012

      I just compared this recipe with the one published in The Best of Chef at Home cookbook. In the book it says “one 3- or 4-bone standing prime rib roast, about 7 lb (3.2 kg).” That should make more sense :)

  6. lenore said: On Apr 18, 2011

    I am having a frozen stannding rib roast for Easter dinner/ Should I thaw it first or put it in the oven frozen.

    • Ken said: On Nov 3, 2013

      stick it in frozen at 500 degrees for 90 then turn it down to 300 for 2 more hours that should do it

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I’m a FoodTV host, cookbook author and official food ambassador for Prince Edward Island, more importantly I’m a Dad and passionate home cook!